The Opioid Crisis, The Courts, And The Chamber of Commerce

On Sunday, the Washington Post published a detailed investigative report about how the drug industry snuck through Congress a bill that ruined one of the Drug Enforcement Agency’s key tools in the fight against the opioid epidemic. The DEA’s own chief administrative judge, John Mulrooney, has a forthcoming law review article about how the new law made it “all but logically impossible” for the DEA to stop drug manufacturers and distributors from dumping opioids out onto the streets, even when they are doing so in obvious violation of federal law.       That outrageous bill is just one part ... Continue Reading

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Equifax And The Long Legal Road In Data Breach Class Actions

    Equifax, which knows more about you than your own mother, (1) failed to maintain its servers, (2) was hacked and lost sensitive personal data for 143 million people, (3) concealed that fact for months, (4) blamed another company for the problem, then (5) finally admitted it caused the problem. To make matters worse, after the hack but before disclosing it, three executives sold off nearly $2 million in Equifax stock.       “What should I do to protect myself?” is a difficult question to answer. The Federal Trade Commission put up a page recommending checking your credit ... Continue Reading

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A Plaintiff’s Guide To Fed.R.Civ.P. 26 Discovery Proportionality

    Civil litigators often spend more time in discovery disputes than in trials. Few plaintiffs or defendants are keen on spending time in a deposition, collecting documents, or handing over to their opponent evidence that could be used against them later. Yet, as the Supreme Court said 70 years ago while interpreting the original Rules of Civil Procedure, “[m]utual knowledge of all the relevant facts gathered by both parties is essential to proper litigation. To that end, either party may compel the other to disgorge whatever facts he has in his possession.”[1]       In December 2015, the ... Continue Reading

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Daubert In Product Liability Cases: Mid-2017 Update

  I’ve written about the Supreme Court’s Daubert opinion many times before, tagging it with the label “junk science.” The phrase “junk science” never actually appeared in Daubert, but rooting it out has been the animating concern behind the application of Daubert. See, e.g., Amorgianos v. National RR Passenger Corp., 303 F. 3d 256, 267 (2nd Cir., 2002)(“The flexible Daubert inquiry gives the district court the discretion needed to ensure that the courtroom door remains closed to junk science while admitting reliable expert testimony that will assist the trier of fact.”)       In federal courts today, Daubert has ... Continue Reading

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Free Speech And Trump Tweets: When Twitter Is A Limited Public Forum

[Update, June 6, 2017: A week after I wrote the below, the Knight Institute wrote a letter to President Trump arguing the same. Eugene Volokh says there's a "private capacity" argument. I addressed that below, the same way the Davison court ruled on it. Moreover, just today Press Secretary Sean Spicer admitted the tweets are "official statements by the President of the United States." Also, Charles Ornstein has a good summary of other elected officials blocking constituents, and litigation over it.]       While in the White House, Donald Trump’s personal twitter timeline, @realDonaldTrump, remains a key method by ... Continue Reading

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Goodyear v. Haeger: The Supreme Court Muddles Sanctions Law Again

Earlier this month the Supreme Court decided Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. v. Haeger et al., a case I wrote about way back in 2012 involving the scope of sanctions (including attorney’s fees) available when a party to a lawsuit brazenly lies about important evidence throughout most of the case.       The case involves a tire defect lawsuit and the extraordinary lengths to which the defendant, Goodyear, went to hide evidence of its culpability.       These are the underlying facts: the Haeger’s motorhome swerved and flipped over when one of the Goodyear G159 tires blew out. ... Continue Reading

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Is Judge Gorsuch Really Committed To Legal Textualism?

Judge Gorsuch’s confirmation hearing for his nomination to the United States Supreme Court begins today. He has been called “an originalist and a textualist,” someone with a “strong commitment to textualism.” He is repeatedly compared to the late Justice Scalia, a comparison that seems to have merit.       I am no fan of “originalism” or “textualism.” In practice, being an “originalist” or a “textualist” is a lot like being “gluten-free” except when it comes to pasta and bagels. There’s no consistent logic to these approaches and, just as bad, there’s no consistent application of them. I have yet ... Continue Reading

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Treating Physicians & Non-Retained Expert Witnesses: What Do Parties Have To Disclose Before Trial?

      Federal court litigators are of course familiar with Fed.R.Civ.P. 26(a)(2)(B), which requires “a written report” from the witnesses we typically think of as “expert witnesses,” i.e., the witnesses “retained or specially employed to provide expert testimony in the case or one whose duties as the party's employee regularly involve giving expert testimony.” But what about other types of expert witnesses?       “Non-retained” expert witnesses are more common in federal court than many people realize: think of the doctors who treated an injured plaintiff, the government employees who investigated an accident, the engineers who worked on ... Continue Reading

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HR 985: A Sneak Attack On Veterans, Consumers, and Patients

Without even holding a hearing, the House Judiciary Committee just passed a new bill (H.R. 985) that would make it far harder to sue large corporations when they cheat or hurt people. The vote was on party lines, with all Republicans voting for it and all Democrats voting against. The bill now goes to the full House — but there’s still time to make sure your Representatives know how you feel about it. Call your Representative and tell them to put their constituents ahead of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the top-spending lobbyist in the country.       Have ... Continue Reading

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Rethinking Article III Standing Requirements

More than 2.6 million people tuned in to hear the Ninth Circuit’s oral argument in State of Washington, et al., vs. Donald Trump, President of the United States, et al, one of the cases challenging the Muslim refugee ban. It was a remarkable display of public interest in the workings of the federal judiciary. Those curious citizens were then treated to a lengthy argument over standing, one of the more obscure and frustrating doctrines in the law.       “Standing” refers to a particular plaintiff’s ability to bring a particular claim. If your third cousin gets hit by a ... Continue Reading

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