Tag Archives: Actos Bladder Cancer

When Should The Statute Of Limitations Run For Medication Lawsuits?

Last week, our firm blog posted a short note about how Actos patients with bladder cancer in Kentucky, Louisiana, and Tennessee should move quickly to file because those states have a one-year statute of limitations for personal injury actions. We (and a whole bunch of other lawyers) assume that Takeda Pharmaceuticals will argue that the statute of limitations began to run on June 15, 2011, when the FDA issued an updated warning that one year of Actos use increases the risk of bladder cancer by more than 40%. As if on cue, the next day Pfizer moved for summary judgment on a whole swatch of consolidated Chantix ... Continue Reading

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Yaz and Propecia Labels Updated; Are They Subsequent Remedial Measures?

As I've written before, anti-consumer legislators and judges have so thoroughly eviscerated claims against pharmaceutical companies that in most states there's only a single claim left: the claim that brand-name drug manufacturers failed to warn about the risks of the drug. As long as the company warned about the risks of the drugs, they're essentially immune from liability, even if the drugs weren't properly tested, even if they were deceptively marketed, and even if the drug didn't perform as promised. (Sometimes state and federal attorneys general can sue over drugs that were falsely marketed, like how Johnson & Johnson was ... Continue Reading

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The Most Unfair Prescription Drug And Medical Device Opinions Of 2011

A few days ago I reviewed the list of "worst" pharmaceutical and medical device liability court opinions of the last year as chosen by the defense lawyers at Drug & Device Law, so I feel obligated to follow-up on their post on the "best" prescription drug and medical device decisions. The short version is quite simple: drug and device companies really like activist judges legislating from the bench or overruling juries' factual findings. How else to explain the love for PLIVA, Inc. v. Mensing, in which the United States Supreme Court couldn't find a federal statute or regulation in support of ... Continue Reading

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The Unintentional Message Of The “Worst” Drug And Device Court Opinions

[Update: Drug & Device Law has also released their list of "best" cases, and so I have responded.] First, a bow to my opponent. I reference the pharmaceutical company defense lawyers from Dechert at Drug & Device Law a lot here on this blog even though, as a plaintiff's lawyer, I'm always on the other side from them (one might even say they're on the wrong side of the law) because they write a great blog. They write detailed, passionate arguments about substantive issues of law, and they link liberally, involving others in the conversation. It's not that I haven't noticed you ... Continue Reading

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