Tag Archives: Beasley Firm

The Three Types Of Practicing Lawyer Blogs

SCOTUSBlog, the premier media source — internet, newspaper, anywhere — for Supreme Court news, has just undergone a revision, including sponsorship by Bloomberg Law. Scott Greenfield, the premier source for complaints about legal blogging, thinks something was lost in translation: Most disturbing is the resort to the formulaic approach of "ask the expert," and the expert invariably being someone with scholarly credentials so that their every utterance comes with built-in academic credibility. We see it in newspaper articles and on television news, the lawprof opining about things he's never personally touched and only seen from afar. We were knee deep ... Continue Reading

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Accountability After The National Championship Air Races Disaster

In the blink of an eye, Jimmy Leeward’s P-51 Galloping Ghost went from rounding the last turn at National Championship Air Races in Reno to sharply pitching upward, rolling over, and then diving straight down into box seats full of spectators. Strange as it is to say, there are reasons to be grateful — had his airplane hit the grandstands, there would have been hundreds, not dozens, of injuries. Flying in general and P-51s in particular have a special place around our firm; Jim Beasley, Sr., was an FAA-certified flight instructor who flew several WWII-vintage planes, including P-51s, and Jim ... Continue Reading

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Massive Emergency Room Malpractice Award For Noncompliant Patient

I’ve written several times before about where multi-million dollar jury verdicts come from, like in A Look Behind The Scenes Of A Multi-Million Dollar Personal Injury Verdict and Strange Birth Injury Award: $21M Medical Expenses, $0 Pain and Suffering. There’s no secret recipe. Facts win cases; outrage at the defendant’s reckless conduct makes the damage awards larger. Another example was published yesterday in The Legal Intelligencer: A Philadelphia jury awarded $21.4 million on Friday to a diabetic man with brain damage over the care he received in the emergency room of Temple University Hospital. …   The defense argued in ... Continue Reading

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Lawyering Up After An Amusement Park Accident

[Update: Abiah's family has retained our firm as counsel; here's the Inquirer story about the suit we filed on their behalf. The below post was written and published before we represented them and should not be taken as a statement about the case on their behalf. Click the following link to read more about our amusement park accident lawsuit practice.] If you’re in Southeastern Pennsylvania or Southern New Jersey, you undoubtedly heard the tragic story of Abiah Jones, the 11-year-old girl on a class trip who fell from a Ferris wheel at Morey’s Piers in Wildwood, New Jersey. The cause ... Continue Reading

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Why Philadelphia Is The Worst Judicial Hellhole In The United States

The American Tort Reform Association's Annual Report on "Judicial Hellholes" is out again. Whoops, I mixed up my link — that's a link to reasonable commentary by the Center for Justice & Democracy. The actual misleading, faux-scientific report is here. My take is similar to The Pop Tort's ode to the judicial hellholes list: Your courageous “Judicial Hellholes” report at long last draws attention to the many injustices corporations have to face day in and day out.  You have finally given a voice to the “mom and pop” tobacco companies, gasoline conglomerates, and insurance providers. Philadelphia apparently takes #1 on the ... Continue Reading

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Young Lawyers: Be Careful Emulating Great Trial Lawyers

Norm Pattis has some advice for trial lawyers: A friend recommended several films as classics about trial, so my wife and watched one of them over the weekend, Otto Preminger's, Anatomy of a Murder. ... What makes the film worth watching, however, was the manner in which both sides asked patently improper questions designed and intended to anchor themes in the minds of the jurors. Once such a question was asked, the other side predictably objected, and in the course of the objection reframed the issue at hand in the manner intended by the party asking the question. Here's an ... Continue Reading

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Law Is Made On A Lawyer’s Desk: Thoughts On The Supreme Court’s Pending “Judicial Taking” Case

Back in December, the Supreme Court held oral argument on Stop the Beach Renourishment, Inc. v. Florida Department of Environmental Protection. Though the case raises several issues, the primary question is: The Florida Supreme Court invoked “nonexistent rules of state substantive law” to reverse 100 years of uniform holdings that littoral rights are constitutionally protected. In doing so, did the Florida Court’s decision cause a “judicial taking” proscribed by the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution? (See the summary at SCOTUSWiki for more.) "Judicial taking" is in quotes for a reason: the claim has never been recognized by any ... Continue Reading

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