Tag Archives: Dangerous Drug Lawyer

Courts Lag Behind Science In Recognizing How Regular Tylenol Use Causes Liver Damage

One of the more sobering parts of being a trial lawyer is reviewing intakes of potential cases. We routinely talk with people who have just lost a spouse or child or who have recently suffered an injury that will leave them permanently disabled. Many of these accidents happened in the course of activities we all know to have an element of danger, but many involve doing the same thing a million other people do every day. No one expects that giving their kid Motrin will cause a horrific skin disease or that their tap water might be so polluted that it's ... Continue Reading

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Why Merck Still Doesn’t Warn About Propecia Causing Impotence

The pharmaceutical industry is plagued by the same problem as the entertainment industries: their business models are too reliant on blockbusters.  I'm certainly not the first person to notice that — even drug company CEOs have openly fretted about it — but the problem persists and grows each year. As the pharmaceutical consulting company L.E.K. pointed out a few months ago, "Blockbusters have become the centerpiece of the biopharma industry, growing from 16% of global drug revenue in 1995 to 35% in 2010." In the entertainment industry, the consequences of that reliance on blockbusters is merely a string of bad sequels ... Continue Reading

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Recalled Product Lawsuits Getting Harder, Children’s Tylenol Edition

One thing you learn as a personal injury lawyer is that many everyday products are far more dangerous than you thought. Until I became a lawyer and began screening cases and receiving calls, I hadn't a clue that Children's Motrin could cause Stevens-Johnson Syndrome. Tylenol is another example. I've used acetaminophen safely for years without a problem, and I thanked my lucky stars for it when 1,000mg of the stuff brought me back from the delirium caused by a 104+ fever. Every week, though, approximately ten people die and one-thousand are sent to the emergency department by acetaminophen overdosing. Which ... Continue Reading

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