Tag Archives: Lawyer Marketing

The Real Risks Of Writing A Legal Blog

Over at the North Carolina Law Blog, Jim Dedman, proprietor of Abnormal Use (and friend of this blog) writes about a perceived risk of writing a law blog: that your opponents may take the things you write and use them against you in court. I agree with Jim entirely that there isn’t much reason to worry about that, not least because of the low odds that you will actually say something your opponent could really use against you in court.  I believe in what I do as a lawyer and so my thoughts expressed on this blog are usually consistent with ... Continue Reading

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Susan G. Komen, March of Dimes, and Corruption by Branding

[Update, February 3, 2012: The Komen Foundation reversed its decision. That's of course the right decision; the question now is if they will publicly explain how they came to make such an obvious mistake, and why they dishonestly denied the influence of politics in making the decision.] If by chance you read this blog but live under a rock, earlier this week the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc., cut all grant funding for Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Inc. For some reason the Susan G. Komen Foundation claims the decision wasn't political even though, of course, it was. This isn't ... Continue Reading

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The Secret Behind The Dumb But Successful Lawyer

Lawyers, particularly young lawyers, often pride themselves on being more clever than one another, and so particularly resent other lawyers who don't seem to possess the same rapier wit and razor-sharp reasoning skills we claim for ourselves. Every lawyer knows that dimwit who they can't believe even passed the bar. The one with all those uninspiring and poorly-researched arguments in their briefs that never cite any relevant cases. The one who prefaces every argument to the court with "in layman's terms," as if the judge wasn't also a lawyer. The one who, despite being dumb as a stump, has a steady clip ... Continue Reading

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Andy Warhol And The Purpose Of Law School

A couple days ago the New York Times inexplicably had a front-page story on an issue that is news to no one: law schools don't teach much about the practical side of lawyering. Yeah, no kidding.  All the usual folks have chimed in (see, e.g., Greenfield, Concurring Opinions, Above The Law, etc.; probably my favorite was Balkinzation tying it larger economic forces), with Elie Mystal having the most depressing take of all: At the end of the day, this all comes down to the lack of responsibility and critical thinking on the part of individual prospective law students. Law students ... Continue Reading

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Philadelphia’s Complex Litigation Center Under Attack Again

[UPDATE II, February 7, 2012: Mike Tremoglie at Legal News Line (which is owned by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's Institute for Legal Reform) has published two follow-up stories in which I was quoted, one about the issue in general, and one about follow-up data the ICLE published on the location of plaintiffs in Philadelphia mass torts cases.] [UPDATE, December 3, 2011: More than a month after my post, the Wall Street Journal chimed in with an editorial parroting the "study" I discussed below. The WSJ, too, noted that, in medical malpractice trials, "Philadelphia juries find in favor of plaintiffs more often ... Continue Reading

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The Politics Of Finding A Lawyer In Philadelphia

The Philadelphia Bar Association’s annual Bench-Bar conference is always interesting and, true to legal conference form, usually held some distance away from the actual location they’re discussing, and so a bunch of Philadelphia lawyers and judges went to Atlantic City to discuss Philadelphia. For the long version, see the Philadelphia Bar Association’s collection of the speeches turned into podcasts. For the short version, see The Legal Intelligencer: The biggest inequities in the Philadelphia court system are not caused by corrupt judges, but by a collision involving the lawyers’ monopoly in providing legal services, harsh economic realities facing young lawyers and ... Continue Reading

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The Three Types Of Practicing Lawyer Blogs

SCOTUSBlog, the premier media source — internet, newspaper, anywhere — for Supreme Court news, has just undergone a revision, including sponsorship by Bloomberg Law. Scott Greenfield, the premier source for complaints about legal blogging, thinks something was lost in translation: Most disturbing is the resort to the formulaic approach of "ask the expert," and the expert invariably being someone with scholarly credentials so that their every utterance comes with built-in academic credibility. We see it in newspaper articles and on television news, the lawprof opining about things he's never personally touched and only seen from afar. We were knee deep ... Continue Reading

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The Sue-Happy Lie: Don’t Believe Every Legal Infographic You See

Search engine optimization is all the rage today, and one of the most common tools is to create an infographic. In theory, people will see your pretty graphic and, if they agree with it, will link to it, and thereafter sprinkle your website with more Google SEO fairy dust. The folks at SEOBook made infographics about Google’s algorithm. Even big firms like Morrison & Foerster are into the infographic game with their Short History of Social Media. That’s not to say all infographics are bad. I like both of the above graphics. Information Is Beautiful truly is beautiful, and appears ... Continue Reading

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Attorney Work-Life Balance and the Stalwart Worker

If you follow any legal news or law blogs, you won't go long without another article on the concept of "work-life balance." I try to stay out of the debate because it usually goes nowhere, but I've even had a post on it before. Two recent posts inspired me to write about it again. First, the Young Lawyers' Editorial Board at The Legal Intelligencer: We were saddened to learn about a 32-year-old corporate associate who passed away in June of an apparent heart attack. Some commentators have suggested a connection between her premature death and her workload, which had been ... Continue Reading

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Disruptive Innovation In Medicine And Law

There's been a lot of chatter on a couple law blogs about Rachel Rodgers, a 2009 law graduate with a knack for marketing herself. She's licensed in New York and New Jersey but practices out of a home office in Arizona, where she's not licensed; I'm not sure if it's a "virtual law office," because I don't know what that marketing term really means, but I consider it to be one. Let's reflect for a moment on how novel that sort of law practice is. Not for Rachel in particular — she certainly didn't invent telecommuting — but historically: until ... Continue Reading

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